The Grizzly cabin is a great 2 bedroom one story getaway.
We have been hearing from a number of retirees who want a cabin without a second floor and the Grizzly is a great option for those people.

This is a beautiful small cabin which is easy to build and is perfect for sitting on the porch and watching the sun rise and set.

Anyone wanting to build next spring is already late for that happening. The quickest you can get permits now would be February which is when the season will be starting.

We have some slots and builders who can stack these anywhere in the country with competitive rates for you.

Call or email for details on this gorgeous cabin.

Thanks,
Gary Bray

What is the timeframe for building my log cabin?

The most asked question:
How long will it take to build my cabin?
My partner with Sierra Log & Timber Homes added to my points:

1. Consider cost and plan a budget – The first and most foundational step to planning any large-scale project is designing a realistic budget. When budgeting to build a home, it’s important to include both the cost of construction and the cost of developing the lot on which to build. Figure out how much you can afford to spend before you begin looking for lots to avoid falling for one outside your price range. Then, if needed, speak to your bank to arrange loans for lot purchase and house construction. On top of the typical costs of building a home, there are always bound to be unforeseen costs, so make sure to account for these as well in your original plan. We at Sierra Log and Timber are here to help you with your cost planning for both lot development and home building costs.

2. Zoning, setbacks and CC&R’s – Wherever you build, it’s important to be familiar with the zoning, setback regulations and the CC&R (covenate, concerns & restrictions) for your lot. Some neighborhoods, for instance, have protective covenants or design guidelines to be considered such as Architectural Review Boards that will oversee and approve what you build, while others impose setbacks—minimum distances required between lot lines and structures. The impact of these regulations will vary with the size of the lot, but are important to be aware of before purchasing.

3. Utilities:

Water – Will your water supply come from a city or community system or will you need to install a well? Tap fees for city or community systems can vary widely depending on the location of your plot, so do some research in advance, check into cost of water hook-up, and also the water meter price and availability. If, on the other hand, you’ll need to install a well, check into the cost of a drilling permit.
Electricity – How close is the nearest power source to the lot you’re considering or is there a power hook up at the lot. What type of fee will be required to connect to it? Since the time of installation can vary, make sure to ask the utility company how long it will take in advance since your building schedule may depend on their response. This is the time to consider solar “off-grid” systems if the cost of bring in the “grid” power is too expensive.
Sewer – Just as with water, you’ll need to discover if your lot will be able to connect to a community sewer system or whether you’ll need to install your own. Calculate an estimate of the cost by numbering each of the bedrooms, baths, sinks, etc. that your home will have. If a sewer system will not be available, your county jurisdiction will require you to have a percolation test preformed to discover how well the property can handle a septic system. Septic systems can be very expensive if they are required to be engineered.
Gas – Yet another category to plan into your budget, natural gas is often accessible for a tap fee. Where gas is not available, many people purchase propane as a substitute.
4. Topography and soils – While many people only consider the views that a lot can offer, it’s important to look at all factors that could impact construction. Study the topography of the lots you’re considering. What are some of its physical features? Does it contain lots of trees or rocks, steep slopes, or natural water sources such as creeks, ponds, rivers, etc.? Will you be able to construct the home you’re envisioning without flattening or excavating the entire plot? Is the soil prone to erosion where you would plan to build? In California, many counties will require a structural soils test so your engineer can design the appropriate foundation. Check with your county, there can be huge expenses relating to the test and the type of foundation required. These are all important questions that can be answered by a careful examination of each lot’s physical features.

5. Natural resource rights – Natural resources include water, minerals, timber and access rights, etc. Find out if the property you’re examining contains natural resources held by any third parties. This issue can be more complicated than you might anticipate, so consider doing a little research before making any purchases. If, for instance, an outside company holds the mineral rights to the land you purchase it could mean they have the right to drill for oil. Although extreme, this is a possibility you anticipate and plan for.

6. Taxes – Many states impose different tax rates on residential and non-residential land, which could negatively impact a decision to purchase land and then delay construction. Make sure to be familiar with the relative tax rates and plan your budget accordingly.

Thank you,
Gary Bray

Background

This is just a note to describe what my company can do for you and why. Bray Log & Lumber started 15 years ago as a small one man operation to service the log home industry supplying pine cants and boards. It did very well the first five years until the 2008 collapse and like many companies I got caught with some sizable bad receivables and have been trying to dig out ever since during the last decade which we all know how that was. This recovery has helped immensely.

The entire time I was and am handshake partners with another Log Home company and we specialized in cedar log homes. This was a fairly steady income although fairly stagnant and no real opportunity for growth so two years ago began to branch out into the barn industry providing them board and batten. This still limited the growth opportunity since barns are very price oriented which does not lend itself to cedar which is higher cost than some other alternatives.

Finances

As my financial situation became more stressed I decided to start reaching out to the timber frame market and was very well received since many of my suppliers for log homes are a natural fit for timber framers as well as being able to provide job lot shipments. While talking with a number of my new contacts I have found what this was actually made to do. I am building a network so timber frame and log home companies can interchange their strengths in their marketplace while minimizing their weaknesses.

Network

Many of the companies have approached me with a network to take their competition with each other and become a giant team. Some timber framers have C&C machines while others do the work by hand and would like to make use of those machines and vice versa. I can bring you together so you can get the business and not push your work schedules. What I am building is a network for log and timber frame companies to work together and become more effective taking advantage of each other's strengths as this grows together.

My biggest issue is still having to overcome the financial burden from the past 8 years and trying to stay afloat although the future looks bright. This is the primary reason for my needing 50% deposits to satisfy my mills. Hopefully you will understand and we can in the future work towards a more standard terms but the mills require it now. I appreciate the general acceptance, it has been a godsend.

Moving Forward with you

The network is now about 150 companies and mills with more coming on board all the time. This gives you the ability to share skills, inventory and sales most companies do not have the time to share.

This network was not the plan when I began calling but it has shown the direction it is going to take and am very excited where it is going. There are so many unique skills in this group and only limited by your imaginations. Please share with me which projects/excess inventory, etc you would like to consider farming out or abilities you have that are not being fully utilized. I will offer it out to the network and see who can be helped with it.

Thank youi

Gary Bray

The most asked question:
How long will it take to build my cabin?
My partner with Sierra Log & Timber Homes added to my points:

1. Consider cost and plan a budget – The first and most foundational step to planning any large-scale project is designing a realistic budget. When budgeting to build a home, it’s important to include both the cost of construction and the cost of developing the lot on which to build. Figure out how much you can afford to spend before you begin looking for lots to avoid falling for one outside your price range. Then, if needed, speak to your bank to arrange loans for lot purchase and house construction. On top of the typical costs of building a home, there are always bound to be unforeseen costs, so make sure to account for these as well in your original plan. We at Sierra Log and Timber are here to help you with your cost planning for both lot development and home building costs.

2. Zoning, setbacks and CC&R’s – Wherever you build, it’s important to be familiar with the zoning, setback regulations and the CC&R (covenate, concerns & restrictions) for your lot. Some neighborhoods, for instance, have protective covenants or design guidelines to be considered such as Architectural Review Boards that will oversee and approve what you build, while others impose setbacks—minimum distances required between lot lines and structures. The impact of these regulations will vary with the size of the lot, but are important to be aware of before purchasing.

3. Utilities:

Water – Will your water supply come from a city or community system or will you need to install a well? Tap fees for city or community systems can vary widely depending on the location of your plot, so do some research in advance, check into cost of water hook-up, and also the water meter price and availability. If, on the other hand, you’ll need to install a well, check into the cost of a drilling permit.
Electricity – How close is the nearest power source to the lot you’re considering or is there a power hook up at the lot. What type of fee will be required to connect to it? Since the time of installation can vary, make sure to ask the utility company how long it will take in advance since your building schedule may depend on their response. This is the time to consider solar “off-grid” systems if the cost of bring in the “grid” power is too expensive.
Sewer – Just as with water, you’ll need to discover if your lot will be able to connect to a community sewer system or whether you’ll need to install your own. Calculate an estimate of the cost by numbering each of the bedrooms, baths, sinks, etc. that your home will have. If a sewer system will not be available, your county jurisdiction will require you to have a percolation test preformed to discover how well the property can handle a septic system. Septic systems can be very expensive if they are required to be engineered.
Gas – Yet another category to plan into your budget, natural gas is often accessible for a tap fee. Where gas is not available, many people purchase propane as a substitute.
4. Topography and soils – While many people only consider the views that a lot can offer, it’s important to look at all factors that could impact construction. Study the topography of the lots you’re considering. What are some of its physical features? Does it contain lots of trees or rocks, steep slopes, or natural water sources such as creeks, ponds, rivers, etc.? Will you be able to construct the home you’re envisioning without flattening or excavating the entire plot? Is the soil prone to erosion where you would plan to build? In California, many counties will require a structural soils test so your engineer can design the appropriate foundation. Check with your county, there can be huge expenses relating to the test and the type of foundation required. These are all important questions that can be answered by a careful examination of each lot’s physical features.

5. Natural resource rights – Natural resources include water, minerals, timber and access rights, etc. Find out if the property you’re examining contains natural resources held by any third parties. This issue can be more complicated than you might anticipate, so consider doing a little research before making any purchases. If, for instance, an outside company holds the mineral rights to the land you purchase it could mean they have the right to drill for oil. Although extreme, this is a possibility you anticipate and plan for.

6. Taxes – Many states impose different tax rates on residential and non-residential land, which could negatively impact a decision to purchase land and then delay construction. Make sure to be familiar with the relative tax rates and plan your budget accordingly.

Thank you,
Gary Bray

Just finishing another Trapper Cabin
The crew is just finishing the dry in of another cabin up in the Cascades with a million dollar view. This cabin was a two year battle with the state and counties to get it up and a few times we thought the state would win. 

The Watkins stayed with it through thick and thin and were rewarded with a beautiful cabin which they will be finishing in the spring. If you are planning on building next year now is when you begin the process and especially with the states which are harder to build in.

Our builders are scheduling now for May and June so it is advised to get an early start if you are wanting to get it done by this time next year. Unfortunately there are only so many we can build with the limited number of builders available.

For the details of this cabin email and we will show you how you can put this gorgeous Trapper Cabin on your get away location.

Thank You,
Gary Bray